Tag Archives: Judith Miller

Book Review, “The Chapel Car Bride,” Judith Miller author

chapel car bride book review

The Chapel Car Bride, by Judith Miller, tells the story of Hope Irvine. Having spent several years in Pittsburgh with her aunt, Hope is now ready to move on with her life. She is excited to accompany her father, the preacher in a railroad car that has been converted into a traveling church.

Hope is thrilled to play the organ for her father’s church services and to teach the children Bible stories on the chapel car. But when they arrive in Finch, West Virginia, they face a multitude of challenges. The people there are coal miners and are very suspicious of outsiders. Luke Hughes, a part-time coal miner, wants to learn all he can from Reverend Irvine while he has the opportunity. As he spends time with the preacher, he also begins to grow closer to Hope. When Kirby Finch, the mine owner’s son, comes to town and begins spending time with Hope, Luke begins to suspect that Kirby may be involved in illegal activities that put Hope in danger.

I enjoyed this book.  While Hope seemed a little naive, she was gracious and self-sacrificing. Luke was an ordinary man trying to help his family and follow God’s will.

I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading Christian historical fiction.

Kara

I received this book free from the publisher and was not required to write a positive review.

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Book Review, “The Artisan’s Wife,” Judith Miller author

The Artisan's Wife cover

The Artisan’s Wife, by Judith Miller, is the third book in the Refined by Love series. This is a wonderful stand-alone story, even if one has not read the first two novels. It touches on many of the social issues of its setting, West Virginia 1876, such as women’s roles in business and the treatment of those with mental disorders.

Ainslee McKay is shocked and devastated when her twin sister secretly elopes, leaving her to go to Weston, West Virginia to fulfill their obligation to run the family’s new tile works alone. Nervous even with her brother’s temporary presence, she agrees only with the stipulation that the business be sold as soon as possible. Levi Judson arrives to apply for a job, bringing designs for new decorative tiles, and Ainslee is fascinated by his talent and ideas for expanding the business. When she discovers that Judson has a brother in the local insane asylum, a new approach to treating those with mental issues, she is unsure about how to proceed.

I enjoyed this book very much. Ainslee’s hesitation to take charge of a business and to deal with those with mental issues is something people can relate to even today. I especially enjoyed Mrs. Brighton, the cheerful owner of the boarding house.

I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys Christian historical fiction.

Kara

I received this book free from the publisher and was not required to write a positive review.

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